Why learn Welsh?

I whined on twitter about my lack of blogular inspiration, and got asked why I’m learning Welsh.

There’s a lot of reasons!

Number one, because it was at one point a relatively endangered language and while it’s getting better as more schools in Wales teach the language, there’s still only 431,000 people in Wales who can speak, read, and write the language as of 2011. That’s a pretty tiny number to preserve a language!

Number two, I am an enormous history dork with an interest in pre-Roman Britain. Welsh is the descendent of the Brythonic Celtic language spoken in Britain before first the Romans and then the Anglo-Saxons came charging in to take over. As such, it’s not a Romance language unlike every other language I’ve learned at least a bit of (French, Spanish, and Portuguese). Romance languages, being descended from Latin, are all pretty regular and easy to learn. Welsh is at least an Indo-European language so it’s not totally unfamiliar, but it shares many of the features of irregular verbs etc with English, which makes it a bit of a bastard to learn but incredibly interesting from a historical perspective. For example, the Welsh word for window is “ffenest” which is clearly taken from Latin (fenestra). This suggests that ancient Britons didn’t have a specific word for “window” until the Romans came along and taught them one, and indeed many (most?) of the pre-Roman houses excavated in Britain don’t even have windows. But the Welsh word for sheep is “dafad” which is unrelated to either the Latin “ovis” or the Anglo-Saxon “sheep” or even the French “mouton”, so clearly ancient Britons had sheep.

And number three, genealogically speaking, a good chunk of my ancestors came to the US from Wales, so why not learn Welsh? Irish Gaelic is the descendent of an older Celtic language, so it might tell me more from a historical perspective, but I’m mostly Welsh so what the heck why not learn it.

Comments (0) | Uncategorized — Andrea @ 1200 on 1 February, 2016

Leave a Reply